Actin protrusions microencapsulated in a 3D collagen matrix.

来源:中国生理学会基质生物学专业委员会    添加时间:2016-02-27 12:46:25
Mechanoresponsive, omni-directional and local matrix-degrading actin protrusions in human 
mesenchymal stem cells microencapsulated in a 3D collagen matrix.

Fu Chak Ho, Wei Zhang, Yuk Yin Li, Barbara Pui Chan

Department of Mechanical Engineering,Haking Wong Building, Pokfulam Road, The University of Hong 
Kong, Hong Kong
 Special Administrative Region.

Abstract

Cells are known to respond to multiple niche signals including extracellular matrix and mechanical loading. 
In others and our own studies, mechanical loading has been shown to induce the formation of
 cell alignme
nt in 3D collagen matrix with random meshwork, challenging our traditional understanding
 on the necessit
y of having aligned substrates as the prerequisite of alignment formation. This motivates
 our adventure in 
deciphering the mechanism of loading-induced cell alignment and hence the discovery
 of the novel 
protrusive functional structure at the cellematrix interface. Here we report the formation of
 mechanorespo
nsive, omni-directional and local matrix-degrading actin protrusions in human mesenchymal stem cells 
(hMSCs) microencapsulated in collagen following a shifted actin assembly/disassembly
 balance. These 
actin protrusive structures exhibit morphological and compositional similarity to filopodia and invadopodia 
but differ from them in stability, abundance, signaling and function. Without
 ruling out the possibility that
 these structures may comprise special subsets of filopodia and invadopodia, we propose to name them as 
mechanopodia so as to reveal their mechano-inductive mechanism.
 We also suggest that more intensive 
investigations are needed to delineate the functional significance
 and physiological relevance of these struct
ures. This work identifies a brand new target for cellematrix
 interaction and mechanoregulation studies.

Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25890737

Copyright © 2014 中国基质生物学专业委员会 Chinese Society of Matix Biology (CSMB)